Tag Archives: spruce bolete

Spruce Bolete

20 Sep

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Leccinum piceinum are starting to arise along with the white matsutakes which I showed earlier tonight.

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This gotta be the easiest of red capped Leccinums to identify since it only grows under conifers and usually in thick moss.

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It also has some loose cuticle material hanging from the cap margin which aids in identifying this one, though there are other red capped Leccinums with similar loose hanging cap edges though they will be growing near birch or poplar trees.

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Spruce Bolete is considered a good edible if you only eat the caps and cook them thoroughly , it also drys well which makes it more flavourful.

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Spruce bolete amongst the white matsutake woods

6 Oct

Here are a few photos of Spruce boletes (Leccinum piceinum). I usually can not ID orange/red cap scaber-caps with many different staining colors and cap and stem scabers, but these were in a strictly conifer only woods where I was gathering white matsutake, these boletes are considered to be a good edible that is especially flavorful in dried form.

Click on photo to notice the spruce bolete on the rolling mossy terrain.

Off in the back section of this photo are 5  or so white mutsutake mushrooms in dark conifer forest these mushroom can be noticed hundreds of feet away. Actually any mushroom can be seen well in the moss or needle duff with the absence of fallen hardwood leaves.

The 2 orange colored mushrooms picked  up in mixed woods of birch, poplar and conifers are quite noticeable at the back of this tray of mushrooms and are a different variety of Leccinum then the spruce bolete (Leccinum piceinum) and the stem texture, cap cuticle and mushroom flesh staining was very different then the other mushrooms when preparing them for the drier, but if I had 4 or 5 different varieties on this tray these differences would not have been noticed.  Orange/red capped Leccinum are a very common Northern Hemisphere & Atlantic Canadian  mushroom with some very good edibles in the group though IDing them is difficult with 6 to 10 varieties with a couple of possible rogues in the group, there have been some GI illnesses reported in the mid and western USA. Conifer forest narrows down your possible Leccinum species considerably and is a good place to start exploring orange/red cap Leccinums as a possible forageable food source. ciao