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Chokecherries

18 Aug

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Trying a few new food things with chokecherries which I’ll probably post on down the road. Here is a phone photo trailer for you which seems to nicely capture a forager’s view of this abundant wild Maritime fruit. Ciao

 

 

 

 

Amelanchier berries

5 Aug

 

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Adding this photo to my wild fruit page and should also say a few words as this is one of our most spectacular wild fruits when ripening. Sometimes there can be numerous trees with plenty of these white, red and purplish blue berries which are very showy. These Amelanchier berries are also quite tasty especially when cooked in pies, scones and muffins.

We have around 20 different varieties of Amelanchiers here, one with a miniature American football shape which I enjoy seeing and eating. Amelanchiers vary in size from a foot high plant to 25 foot trees. Amelanchier berries are not commonly gathered in the Maritimes though in the Prairie Provinces it is an old favorite which goes by the name of Saskatoon berries. Hope you folks get a chance to see this member of the rose family one day in all its glory in a moist thicket, you’ll be pleased.

Lowbush Blueberries

29 Jul

Super short post on a Maritime wild food favorite, low bush blueberries which tend to grow well in sandy acidic soils, usually dry ones.

Often around this time of the year wild mushrooms are my focus, but with a very dry July in my neck of the woods blueberries came through as a nice alternative which will be much appreciated this winter in many ways. Blueberries are great in desserts and are surprisingly attractive and tasty good in soups, casseroles, etc.

I claimed it was a super short post so I’ll end with the above photo which stirred the stream of thoughts of these lucky blueberries enjoying some lovely shade under a canopy of pleasant scented sweet fern, at a restful blueberry resort right here in New Brunswick ūüôā

Leccinum piceinum

20 Jul

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Here are some photos from a few weeks ago when I gathered a bunch of Leccinum piceinum for drying. The safety in eating orange and red capped Leccinum has been in question for the last decade as a number of folks in NA have suffered GI distress after eating these mushroom fresh and possibly under-cooked but maybe well cooked as well? Supposedly no one has had any issues with the dried mushrooms which can be used in soups or cooked after rehydration. I suspect drying is the way to go if you have any interest in eating red or orange capped Leccinum mushrooms which are usually difficult to identify to specific name.

These mushrooms are real standouts in mossy spruce forest anywhere from late June till November when conditions are right in the Maritimes.

A look under the cap at the pore layer and loose tissue along the edge of the cap.

This is probably the easiest red/orange Leccinum to ID due to it growing in mossy spruce areas with no birch or poplar trees to complicate matters as there are several types of Leccinums growing under those hardwood trees.

Last look at quite a photogenic Maritime mushroom. ciao

 

 

Butyriboletus brunneus

16 Jul

Here is a common Maritime mushroom I’ve avoided doing a post on as some folks will experience allergic reaction to members of this (butter bolete group), even common edibles such as Blewits will cause some people issues, this of course goes beyond wild mushrooms, it’s across the board with foods we find in stores or forest. ¬†I’m not sure of the percentage who will develop GI symptoms from eating these but¬†I suspect it is over 1 in 10 so you may want to not chance this one, for those who¬†try it and it agrees with your system it is an excellent edible.¬†Again though unless you have a long list of wild edible mushrooms you have already tried, it would be unwise to experiment eating one like this early on. This mushroom should be thinly sliced and cooked long. I usually dry them as I like most bolete type mushroom dried to enhance their¬†flavour.

This is a young version, pore surface bright yellow and thin to the cap flesh, stem short and robust.

Here we see the fishnet markings on the right side of the stem which help in identify this mushroom.

Older mushroom with gill layer very thick, on most bolete family members this would mean this mushroom would be too soft and worm holes throughout.

Older mushroom flipped over.

1Left scribed on pores, this helps to ID as the pores should blue quickly after touched.

Here we see the flesh under the thick pore layer still solid and suitable for the table.

I should also mention these mushrooms dry very nicely and have an unusual aroma which I couldn’t find a good description of until¬† someone who visited asked if a cake was in the oven and yes a homemade white cake or sugared lemon loaf fresh from the oven does smell similar, believe it or not. I may try the mushroom powder in desserts or pancakes.

Umbrella polypore

13 Jul

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Short post on my first gathering of Polyporus umbellatus which is a rare and quite unusual wild edible mushroom here the Maritime provinces. This Umbrella polypore is the size of a loaf of bread and has a scent of toffee. Umbrella polypore is also aka the medicinal mushroom Zhu Ling which makes use of the large woody sclerotia underground the fruiting mushroom. These sclerotia left as is should produce fruiting mushrooms for decades, so I shall return next year to check this out. Zhu Ling is best known for its results for folks with lung cancer and has a long history of usage in China. As for ¬†tastiness of this above ground mushroom, I’ll add a comment later on after I fry some up. This mushroom was found near birch, poplar and young beech so keep your eyes open my fellow Maritime foragers.

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Chaga Mushrooms 2017

7 Jan

A phone post on some of the chaga mushrooms I’m seeing in this new year and also other wintery sights of interest from our Maritime forests. The above photo reminds me of a hidden puzzle game or a piece of art you can’t stop staring at it. 

Ice pans or ice disc, first time I witness these around here. I’ve read they can on occasion be quite large, these little ones stayed spinning around this pool for sometime, made for a good rest spot after leaving the birch woods, this was a few days ago and below we get to zone in on how you can usually tell from several hundred feet if a chaga mushroom is a good size for gathering.


 If from afar you see a snow cap on a dark hump on a tree trunk in a hardwood forest with lots of birch in the mix then this calls for a closer look, real simple. Here we see one near the center right of above photo.


Ah, this chaga horn appears to be not too high up the tree. I can chop it at eye level, notice the smaller one close by.

Looking down hill into the valley and mountain across, this chaga harvesting is quite pleasant.

I’m surprised this photo is not more blurry as my out stretched arm was trembling from the weight while I was trying to hold and take this phone photo with the other hand. The pains I will go through to show off my 2017 chaga.

Anyway, now back home it is fresh chaga and matsutake, rosehip tea time. Cheers

Wild Roses Are Pretty Hip

29 Nov

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Going to add a few photos to my wild fruit page so I thought it would be a good time for a short post as well.

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Wild Rose hips are one of the most Vita rich foods we have on this planet and we have quite a few varieties growing wild right here in the Maritime provinces.

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Most of our native roses have rather small hips which turns out to be not a bad thing as you can eat the whole hip with seeds included which gives you plenty of Vit C and Vit E and much more in this healing food. Word of caution though, some may find the seeds hard on their teeth.

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If you do not want to eat them raw there are plenty of recipes, teas, soups, jellies etc available on the net.

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I should also mention our native wild roses¬†are a healthy food you can gather the entire Fall season and even well into the winter. Even if you don’t want to eat them, I hope you enjoyed seeing them and will take note of¬†their brightness this Fall and Winter¬†on your travels. ciao

Notice the aroma of fall

5 Oct

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Haven’t posted in while as I’ve been busy gathering many of my fall mushroom favorites and enjoying the surrounding. Here in the scent of the sea we see the Bay of Fundy and in the rear view mirror a tall conifer tree which are famous for having nice gifts under them.

Tonight I am showing some of surprises you may encounter while out foraging for the also very scentful Matsutake in thick moss under mature conifers. This one in the above photos is my first meeting with the edible Polyozellus multiplex, quite a showy mushroom with an unusual scent.

This mushroom above I didn’t think to take a photo of in its home in the moss as I was overwhelmed at the time by the sweet scent which filled the air above it. No  local plant or tree in flower can compare with this mushroom as you are apt to suspect someone has just broken a bottle of perfume near by. Next time you smell something like this in your local maritime woods look down and you might see a few of these Hydnellum sauveolens which are not edible but a sweet find just the same.Hope you get a chance to fill your senses with all fall has to offer especially in these mature  mossy conifer areas which unfortunately are becoming rarer as of late. Ciao

 

Maritime Lobster Mushrooms

14 Aug

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Lobster Mushrooms are out in good numbers in the Maritimes now, so check out my catch of the day.

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This one is rather smooth with not much sign of gill ridges.

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I find most of my Lobster Mushroom usually near mature Eastern White Pine and an area with mixed woods with large Poplar trees can be prime spots to have a look also.

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These 3 photos show the weight divisions Lobster Mushrooms often fall into with the 1st photo 1/4 lb, 2nd 1/2 lb and last one weighed 1lb.

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The closest Lobster Mushrooms appears slightly over mature but look around as often there will be plenty of good ones near by, the white powder visible on the gill surface is not mold it is actually spores so this is not a sign the mushroom is not still good to eat. Two things to check concerning whether a Lobster Mushroom is still in good shape for eating is a light to slightly darker orange color, nothing in the red to purple range and when you squeeze the stem at ground level it is very firm. If there are soft spots or brown colored areas somewhere on the mushroom above the firm stem just cut them out and you should still have plenty of choice mushroom left.

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Here is what was in a 25 foot area of the above photo.

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Back home with a basketful of goodies which will soon be processed into a yummy Lobster Mushroom marinate thanks to Hank Shaw’s website honest-food.net¬†‚Äļ 2016¬†‚Äļ July¬†‚Äļ 18

Ciao