wild fruit

A few berries gathered close together in a thicket

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Lonicera villosa—-blossoms ready to open

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L. villosa blossoms

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L. villosa fruit

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Teaberry blossom ( Gaultheria procumbens) mid summer

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Teaberry fruit

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Teaberries, photo taken in Nov 2013

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Teaberry patch Nov 2013

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Moxie plums (Gaultheria hispidula)  The leaves from both the Gaultheria shown here make pleasant wintergreen flavoured teas.

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Gaultheria hispidula leaves during late fall.

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Huckleberries

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Huckleberries in Oct DSC07572

Wild thyme and blueberry

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Blueberries

Aronia patch in blossom
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Aronia berries, late August

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Viburnum cassinoides also known as wild raisin

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Viburnum alnifolium, Hobblebush with unripe fruit

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Hobblebush with a few ripe black berries at the end of August

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Blackberries

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Blackberry patch

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Blackberry basket

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Amelanchier sp, almost 20 varieties in the Maritimes.

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Amelanchier berries


young Bristly Gooseberry (Ribes hirtellum)

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Dewberry (Rubus pubescens) ripening at the end of June

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Bunchberry blossum, up to 20 berries can form from the one flower.

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Bunchberries

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Bunchberry patch

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Raspberries

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Highbush cranberries

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highbush cranberry clusters in August

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Highbush Cranberry in late September

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Elderberry blossoms

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Chokecherry blossoms

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Chokecherries

Mountain Ash

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Mountain Ash in its winter coat

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Staghorn Sumac

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Hawthorn, heavily fruiting

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Hawthorn berries

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Wild rose petals

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Late fall rose hips in the rain20161120_103207

Over-wintering batch of wild roses with plenty of hips still edible

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5 Responses to “wild fruit”

  1. Alan Carter April 20, 2013 at 4:30 pm #

    North America has such a great native fruit resource, beautifully recorded here. A lot of them grow quite well here in Scotland too as we have a similar climate to BC. I’m very fond of serviceberries but still haven’t succeeded with bunchberry.

    • 1left April 20, 2013 at 7:36 pm #

      Bunchberries are very common in the acidity (PH below 5) forest soils of Nova Scotia and the other Canadian martime provinces. Most common in open mixed forest with white birch and also with the plant Maianthemum canadense and then it also can be common under pine if moss is present. I’ve read Bunchberry is difficult to get started even here and spreads slowly. Large lowbush blueberry fields are often surrounded on their borders by thick patches of bunchberries before the hardwood forest of sugar maple, yellow birch and beech are reached. I suspect this is a plant you must plant in various places and it will likely grow best where you least expect it. Best of luck, the flowers are lovely and the fruit offer possibilities.

  2. Robin March 9, 2017 at 11:01 am #

    You have wonderful posts with great pictures I moved to N.B. 8 years ago and have been doing as much as I can to learn more and more about edible plants native to N.B. this is a great resource. Thanks so much 🙂

    • 1left March 9, 2017 at 1:17 pm #

      Thanks Robin, nice to see your comment.

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  1. Naturalists after your heart, mind and belly « Sylvabiota - May 11, 2014

    […] Wild Fruit […]

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