Wild edible mushrooms

Never eat any new to you foraged wild mushroom without an expert verifying the mushroom’s Identity. I still after 35 years of gathering wild mushrooms have any new mushrooms I try for the first time verified by a fellow forager with much experience with the mushroom in question or I send dried samples to a mycologist for verification and making a spore print is also a good habit to get into when exploring new wild mushrooms.

Click on the photos to enlarge

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Here is one that is easily mis-identified and a number of poisoning occur every year in Europe, it is rarely eaten in North America and I have saved it and a few others at the bottom of my edible list of mushrooms I would like to try. A trusted mycologist identified dried samples of this mushroom for me as the Sweetbread mushroom, Miller, (Clitopilus prunulus). There is good internet info from Italy, Spain and France on this mushroom but it is a tricky one with a doctor from NY in 2010 admitting himself into the hospital after eating a few Clitocybe mushroom by mistake. So unless you are a very advanced collector breeze by Clitopilus prunulus like I did for the last 3 decades.

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Clitopilus prunulus

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Clitopilus prunulus

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Hydnum umbilicatum – the Little Hedgehog

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Hydnum umbilicatum

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Amethyst Deceiver – Laccaria amethystina

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Amethyst Deceiver

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Grayling -Cantharellula umbonata

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Grayling

DSC03751 Lactarius deterrimus

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Lactarius deterrimus

GYPSYGypsy mushroom ——Cortinarius caperatus

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Gypsy mushroom

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Gypsy mushrooms with the white bloom noticeable on the young caps

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Gypsy mushroom patch

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Gypsy mushrooms amongst the fallen leaves, click on photo to notice the over 20 mushrooms.

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Gypsy mushrooms (Cortinarius caperatus) discard stems and only eat the young caps well cooked

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Yellow foot Chanterelle –Craterellus ignicolor

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Craterellus ignicolor (forked gills)

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Yellow foot Chanterelle ready for drying.

Crat ignicolor

Yellowfoot patch

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Agaricus abruptibulbus, stems deep in soil under Norway spruce tree.

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Agaricus abruptibulbus, with the bulb-like base of the stem visible

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Agaricus abruptibulbus, in the fridge for 2 days, now the open caps show mature brown coloured gills

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Hen of the woods—-Grifola frondosa

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Hen of the woods at the base of an Oak tree

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Hen of the woods in a basket

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Lactarius thyinos

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Sheep Polypore (Albatrellus ovinus)

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Sheep Polypore

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Some well cooked Sheep Polypore

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Albatrellus confluens

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Albatrellus confluens

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Auricularia Americana – Tree ears

Jean Pierre Chanterelle

Chanterelle

Large Chanterelle patch in moss.

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Chanterelle patch

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Chanterelle patch (click on photo to take notice of) the neighbouring patch of (not recommended as edible) large Scaly vase chanterelle up near the basket.

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Winter Chanterelle — Craterellus tubaeformis

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Winter Chanterelle

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Charcoal burner———–Russula cyanoxantha

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Hymenopellis furfuracea, only the caps are edible and they are quite good

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Oudemansiella radicata which is now called Hymenopellis furfuracea with long underground root growth visible, both large and small caps sizes shown.DSC05238 Velvet foot——Flammulina Velutipes on Elm tree

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Flammulina Velutipes

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Dryad’s saddle AKA Pheasant back mushroom on Elm tree (Polyporus squamosus)

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View of pore surface under the cap of a young Dryad’s saddle

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Another view of the young caps. (Dryad’s saddle)

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Dryad’s saddle gathering with tent pole

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Bear’s head tooth

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Hericium americanum in the center of the photo on the tree with the bland but edible Panellus serotinus right beside it.

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Bear’s Head Tooth —————-Hericium americanumDSC05094

White matsutake———–Tricholoma magnivelare

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Basket of White matsutake

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Closer look at some White Matsutakes with the veils opening on some


Lactarius lignyotus, Chocolate Milkcap

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Swollen-stalk cat,  Mori take, Abalone in plant————–Catathelasma ventricosum

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Catathelasma ventricosum

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Catathelasma ventricosum, mature, button and young mushrooms together.

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Chrome-footed bolete———–Harrya chromapes

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Chrome-footed bolete patch

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Boletus subglabripes

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new name same Bolete, now called Hemileccinum subglabripes

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Hemileccinum subglabripes

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Handful of Hemileccinum subglabripes

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Drier full of Hemileccinum subglabripes

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Gem-studded puffball cluster from Nova Scotia Mycological Society foray 2011

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Lobster mushroom

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Lobster mushrooms often look like this before they are uncovered.

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Lobster mushrooms in grass quite a distance from pine trees.

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Lobster mushroom basket

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Lactarius volemusDSC05015

King bolete

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King bolete

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King bolete

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Basket of  boletes

spring oyster ( july 2 )

Spring oyster mushroom——–Pleurotus populinusDSC05275

Oyster mushroom on sugar maple in fall——-Pleurotus ostreatus

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Pleurotus ostreatus, Oct 2013

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Pleurotus ostreatus

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Spruce bolete—————-Leccinum piceinum

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Spruce bolete

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Spruce bolete

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Spruce bolete- caps

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Tricholoma portentosum

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Blewit mushroom

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Blewit (Lepista nuda)

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Tricholoma dulciolens – Matsutake-like

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Tricholoma dulciolens

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Tricholoma dulciolens

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Long slim Matsutake – T dulciolens

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Hollow-stem Suillus

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Hollow-stem Suillus—–Suillus cavipes

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Sweet tooth ——–Hydnum repandum

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A few young Sweet tooth mushrooms also known as the hedgehog mushroom

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Large Sweet tooth or hedgehog mushroom

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under the cap of the hedgehog

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Cap view of large hedgehog mushroom

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Basket of Hydnum repandum var alba

Suillus pictus

Painted Suillus————Suillus pictus

12 Responses to “Wild edible mushrooms”

  1. Opher March 14, 2015 at 5:48 pm #

    That’s great. You look like a fun guy!
    I’m sorry. I couldn’t resist.

    • 1left March 14, 2015 at 10:20 pm #

      Yes that is a joke I here spore-adically though there may be some truth to it. Opher thanks for stopping in and come back often as I’ll always have shroom for you here.

  2. tom April 18, 2015 at 9:10 pm #

    can I send you a pix of what we found? I dont see em in your list

  3. Christian September 13, 2015 at 12:28 am #

    Do you regularly find Amethyst deceiver , or is it a once in a while thing,, i feel like ive seen it before but i could be wrong,, thanks

    • Christian September 13, 2015 at 12:30 am #

      Do they grow in same habitat as winter chantrelles?

      • 1left September 13, 2015 at 7:56 pm #

        Yes as where I find them under young birch a few hundred feet away there are winter chanterelle under some conifers both types of trees are in the same wet mossy area. Since this mushroom is known to bioaccumulate arsenic it is best to eat only in small amounts as it is not easy to know if there is any arsenic available in the forest soil you are foraging in which could possibly be drawn into your mushrooms.

    • 1left September 13, 2015 at 7:20 pm #

      Haven’t seen any this year yet, they are much less common in my area than the deceiver. Only know of a couple spots where they grow in large numbers, wet mossy mixed woods and also mossy young birch can be good, rarely under pine.

  4. Christian September 13, 2015 at 10:08 pm #

    Thank you very much ,, I went out again today and pretty much confirmed that the deceiver was what I had seen next to winter chanterelles , both in wet mix wood bog, and I was going to ask you where to find sweet tooth but found my first patch today,, thanks for posting all those photos and information, so it’s the deceiver that may contain arcenic? Il keep that in mind

  5. Christian September 13, 2015 at 10:12 pm #

    Oh ,, and since I’ve got you on the line,,,,, when is matsutake season and where should I look. Thanks again

    • 1left September 14, 2015 at 1:00 pm #

      In my neck of the woods the first half of Oct is the best time usually. Like many of us Matsutake mushroom love being around mature trees especially hemlock, jackpine and spruce, unfortunately these trees are disappearing at an alarming rate so often where these types of mature trees are troublesome to harvest for one reason or another is where you’ll find the Matsutake.

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