Wild edible plants

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Ostrich fern which are too mature to harvest

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Ostrich fern fiddleheads at good stage to gather for the table.

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More fiddleheads

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Bowl of Ostrich fern fiddleheads ready for cooking

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Apios Americana flowers

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A few more groundnut flowers growing over some daylily stems.

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Apios americana tubers dangling from the river bank.

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Sea Rocket in mid June

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Seaside Plantain, Mid June

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Seabeach Sandwort, early July

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Milkweed flowerbuds in June

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Milkweed flowers, late June

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Milkweed seedpods late August

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Wild Radish seedpods early July

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Clintonia borealis , now flowering well past the edible stage

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Clintonia borealis, aka (Corn lily, Cow tongue, Bluebead lily), here is a plant with young curled leaves ready to be gathered for salad use in late April.

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Trout-lily after flowering with seed pod developing

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Yellow Goatsbeard (Tragopogon pratensis)

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Bowl of Yellow Goatsbeard

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Yellow Goatsbeard in flower, this one is (Tragopogon dubius)

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Yellow Goatsbeard’s open seed-head

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Gill-over-the-ground, Glechoma hederacea, edible in small amounts with caution.

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Stinging  nettle and friend

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June Stinging Nettle in the shade

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Stinging nettle patch on the edge of a stand of Japanese Knotweed

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Baskets full of Stinging nettle

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Japanese Knotweed shoots at excellent stage for eating

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Live-forever also known as Orpine, early spring growth

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Live-forever (Sedum telephium), light green leaves in the center of photo

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Live-forever in tall grass

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Live-forever, Orpine on stream floodplain

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Live-forever with tubers visible

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Evening-primrose in early spring before 2nd year stem develops.

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Evening-primrose root

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Evening-primrose in early June, should grow 3 or 4 feet taller before flowering around Sept.

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Evening-primrose flowers

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Shepherd’s purse just before winter

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Stachys palustris tubers in the center of  the plate

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Wild Horseradish, early spring growth

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Wild Horseradish with flower buds in field of Timothy grass

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Large-leaved Aster at the good stage for gathering

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A bed of Large-leaved Aster in June 2013

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Young Large-leaved Aster leaves

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July 27/13 Large-leaved Aster are beginning to flower, should have some seeds in the fall

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Wild Caraway stems with seeds in late July. (Carum carvi)

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Closer look at Caraway seeds with Water Hemlock behind with white flowers.

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Perennial Sow-thistle (Sonchus arvensis) common on the edge of the salt marsh.

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Sonchus arvensis, spring leaves

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Goutweed (Aegopodium podagraria)

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Young growth of Goutweed leaf stems ideal for gathering.

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Fireweed (Epilobium angustifolium)

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Fireweed shoots, not easy to see in the spring grasses

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Wood Nettle (Laportea canadensis)

 

10 Responses to “Wild edible plants”

  1. Good Hope Nursery August 6, 2013 at 9:07 am #

    So interesting to see your wild plant foods!

    • 1left August 6, 2013 at 9:09 pm #

      Thanks for stopping in, I enjoyed being introduced to some new plants over on your blog as well. ciao

  2. bluebunny01 August 23, 2014 at 4:27 am #

    Lovely. I should try foraging more. I tend to focus on hedgerow fruits and flowers.

    • 1left August 23, 2014 at 12:18 pm #

      You don’t have to go far, start with the plants which surround the hedgerow and flowers you’re already familiar with, you’ll be surprised with what is very close at hand. I’m still finding very interesting foods after many decades of foraging just by questioning what is this which catches my attention at a walking pace.

  3. Opher March 14, 2015 at 5:47 pm #

    Excellent stuff. – Opher from Opher’s World!

  4. Jane anson August 30, 2015 at 10:15 pm #

    I haven’t seen crows feet yet even at market spots – what is it?

    • 1left August 30, 2015 at 11:25 pm #

      I haven’t picked any myself this year though I have seen a small number of people gathering them off and on during the last month as I travel by the marsh. I also seen some large bushy green plants at a shop in Moncton last week so it appears they are near the end of their best tenderness for this year. I suspect this may have been an off year for them as the number of pickers I usually see on the marsh is way down compared to most year. update – I should have mentioned for those wondering what plant (crows feet) are- they’re Salicornia europaea, we have this plant growing small with a single stem and also sometimes large bushy plants over a foot tall, also a thick succulent prostrate version.

  5. Jane anson July 6, 2016 at 7:59 pm #

    Nice to see you. Hope all is well 🙂

    • 1left July 6, 2016 at 10:20 pm #

      Thanks Jane, things go well, wishing you a pleasant summer in the border town.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Naturalists after your heart, mind and belly « Sylvabiota - May 11, 2014

    […] Wild edible plants […]

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