Little known locals

28 Jul

DSC07101

what is it

DSC07102

oh, it has a tail.

DSC07103

Didn’t know it at first but this is a stinkhorn egg probably Phallus impudicus, rarely if eaten at all in N.A.

DSC07086

This one is not uncommon though it is usually just one mid size mushroom which doesn’t draw much attention until you try to pick one. The stem will either snap when breaks like a green bean or you will pull up 1/2 ft of underground stem root. Only the caps of Hymenopellis furfuracea are edible.

DSC07090

Lastly is a colorful mushroom which I often don’t find most years though this year there are many in Maritime mixed and conifer forest, (Boletus speciosus var brunneus), it has quite a name doesn’t it. This mushroom is considered edible though a fraction of the population will experience stomach trouble so you may choose to leave this one off your edible list. Hope you enjoyed seeing some of the locals we rarely get a chance to meet. ciao

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Little known locals”

  1. fodrambler July 29, 2014 at 6:06 am #

    I know this as a Witches Egg but yes it is the thing that a Phallus impudicus springs from. The fungus grows incredibly fast, I have heard that it can grow to six or eight inches in a couple of hours. I found one once in a wood that I was camping in. I wanted to photograph this sudden burst of growth and so I watched it carefully for three days and nothing happened. Eventually I had to give up and go home. I returned the next weekend and it was still there, nothing had happened, so I resumed my watch. I slept in the forest that night. In the morning I found that it had got up before me. It had grown to it’s full size and had already been half consumed by flies. These are very tricky fungi, you have to watch them very carefully 🙂

    • 1left July 29, 2014 at 7:25 pm #

      Yes I have a friend who some years brings a few eggs into his kitchen in hope of catching them in the act. He has taken some interesting photos of them which seem more like an alien animal than an earthen fungi, fascinating.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: