Tag Archives: wild mushrooms nb

Butyriboletus brunneus

16 Jul

Here is a common Maritime mushroom I’ve avoided doing a post on as some folks will experience allergic reaction to members of this (butter bolete group), even common edibles such as Blewits will cause some people issues, this of course goes beyond wild mushrooms, it’s across the board with foods we find in stores or forest.  I’m not sure of the percentage who will develop GI symptoms from eating these but I suspect it is over 1 in 10 so you may want to not chance this one, for those who try it and it agrees with your system it is an excellent edible. Again though unless you have a long list of wild edible mushrooms you have already tried, it would be unwise to experiment eating one like this early on. This mushroom should be thinly sliced and cooked long. I usually dry them as I like most bolete type mushroom dried to enhance their flavour.

This is a young version, pore surface bright yellow and thin to the cap flesh, stem short and robust.

Here we see the fishnet markings on the right side of the stem which help in identify this mushroom.

Older mushroom with gill layer very thick, on most bolete family members this would mean this mushroom would be too soft and worm holes throughout.

Older mushroom flipped over.

1Left scribed on pores, this helps to ID as the pores should blue quickly after touched.

Here we see the flesh under the thick pore layer still solid and suitable for the table.

I should also mention these mushrooms dry very nicely and have an unusual aroma which I couldn’t find a good description of until  someone who visited asked if a cake was in the oven and yes a homemade white cake or sugared lemon loaf fresh from the oven does smell similar, believe it or not. I may try the mushroom powder in desserts or pancakes.

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August Maritime Mushrooms

1 Aug

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Here I am going into a Chanterelle patch.

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Exiting the Chanty patch I turn around to see lots of orange untouched mushrooms on the ground where I’ve passed. Gently tip toeing through and reaching out is important to disturb the moss as little as possible, also leave plenty of mature and small mushrooms. This will benefit you for decades down the road as long as the forest isn’t harvested.

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Next a nice Lobster Mushroom.

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For adventurist Maritime mycophile there seems to be lots of Albatrellopsis confluens out in forest today. In Europe this mushroom is eaten but rated far lower than its common look alike Sheep Polypore. Some folks in Colorado on the other hand claim Albatrellopsis confluens is better than Sheep Polypore as an edible. I find Sheep Polypore is hard to beat though I’m going to give this A confluens another chance to sway me over.

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If you are interested in trying this sometimes common Maritime mushroom you must only sample a few bites the first time which is recommended for any new wild food and make sure you thinly slice and cook at medium heat for over 10 minutes.  The mushroom should turn pinkish while cooking, if it turns lemon yellow it will be a Sheep Polypore. Click on the 2nd photo to notice the smooth pore surface with tiny pin holes, this mushroom often bruises pink or light orange when handled. These are large mushrooms you will notice from afar.

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August shades of the colourful Russula mushrooms, these ones shown here are from mixed and conifer forest as I passed through both on my mile or so of foraging today. I won’t get into the edibility of the Russula mushrooms I’ve shown you here as I can’t even identify some of them, there are over a 100 different reddish Russula along so you can understand my dilemma, nevertheless Russula mushroom as a rule are one of the safer edible groups though there are a few very hot tasting ones you do not want chew on and a few which bruise black which people have had short term stomach issues with, of course seeing these lovely life forms is every bit as pleasant as the food some of them safely provide, with that in mind I hope you’re enjoying all the colors of your local August forest where ever you are. ciao

Sweet Home Tricholoma

17 Oct

 

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Interesting den like structure which should provide sleeping space for 3 appears on this steep decline, the opening is facing straight up and shortly beyond it seems the hill drops straight down a few hundred feet, even though many conifers have managed to hang in there, not to far away on flat lowlands amongst the conifers I start to see some of my favorite Tricholoma mushrooms again, though unfortunately their season is coming to an end soon, maybe if all goes well some of these areas will not fall to a clear cut before my next visit in 2016.

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Have a look at another mushroom which may be mistaken for a Matsutake, this one is Tricholoma focale which is not rated very highly as an edible in most countries, though I have seem claim that it is pretty good when preserved in certain ways, ( I’ll get back to you on this one shhh), I usually only see these in disturbed soils or thin moss, commonly seen here near the coast at a small size of 5 cm, though here are some big ones with 15 cm caps.

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A few Maritime Matsutake ( Tricholoma magnivelare ) possibly to be renamed down the road.

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and the long and slim one, Tricholoma dulciolens, well this is probably it for me and these Tricholoma mushrooms for this year, next up should be Honeys, Oysters and as usual, plenty of surprises. ciao

 

Marinated Lobster mushrooms

16 Sep

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My computer is on the blink it seems so here is my first attempt at a phone post, interested see how it will pan out. Above you see some Lobster mushrooms I’m salting which is one of the first steps in this Italian mushroom marinate recipe from ( honest-food.net — 17) check it out, I’ve tried this recipe with Russula mustelina and Lobster mushrooms last month and they both turned out great.

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It is surprising more folks are not gathering Lobster mushrooms here on the east coast as they are quite common, usually in clusters of 3 to 5 mushrooms. You do seem to lose  some of the mushroom during cleaning as they have soil embedded in them though from this cluster after paring off what I didn’t want I still walked away with 2 lbs of choice wild mushrooms which I would usually dry and eat a small amount fresh though now I really like this mushroom pickled or in this recipe mentioned above from Hunter Anglar Gardener Cook where you salt, boil in vinegar, dry (which I’m going to check my dryer in a minute) then jar up and cover with spiced olive oil. Well I better go get’em.  Ciao