Tag Archives: japanese knotweed

We’re Back

7 May

It has been over 18 months since my last post on wild foods so yes we are back as I found the sight of these peeled Japanese Knotweed shoots to pleasant not to share with you.

In my view and even with my phone camera pics these shoots appear quite appealing even unpeeled. My first experience with J K shoots goes back about 40 years with a not so tasty pie which inspired many years of little use of this abundantly available spring edible. Today peeled, blanched and then soaked and later on cooked with 3 apples into an applesauce it has suddenly become a wonderful food as well as a photogenic spring shoot, a big thank you from me has to go out to those experimential folks sharing info on wild foods at this time. Japanese Knotweed is probably also quite nutritious as well with at least some resveratrol but not near as much as it has in this plants fall roots. if you shied away from J K shoots it may be time to give them another try says eye. ūü¶Č

field and forest

25 Apr

Clintonia borealis are quite common in my area, the one in the photo is at a good stage of growth for eating. Clintonia is a nice cucumbery tasting nibble.

This is probably a very young striped maple or less likely a mountain maple and seemed photo worthy.

Japanese knotweed these shoots are also at a prime harvesting stage.

Live forever lettuce , Sedum telephium is ready for the salad bowl.

Turkey tail, Trametes versicolor a medicinal mushroom, this one is looking rather well for over wintering. ciao

True nature is always in season

4 Apr

I set out this evening to visit an area which I suspected may have the first spring flowers in my area, interestingly enough another plant I forgot about was flowering. I love it when true nature proves me of the path again, anyway I have a few things to show you tonight.

Coltsfoot¬†–Tussilago¬†farfara —- This is a very common plant in Atlantic Canada and has medicinal uses, usually for cough relief. These are the first local spring flowers other than Skunk cabbage flowers

Teaberry–Gaultheria procumbens— Now I¬† think most folks in the north would be surprised to learn that the first ripe¬†berry of the year is the Teaberry¬†which actually over winters and then continues to increase in size and ripen fully¬†in May to June, at least this is so in my neck of the woods. Teaberry fruit and leaves taste of wintergreen and have medicinal properties, don’t try this plant if you are allergic to aspirin.

Japanese knotweed–Polygonum cuspidatum— These grow into large plants often over 8 ft high, here is a photo of young buds, the early growth up to 1 ft¬†can be used similar to rhubarb in desserts or like asparagus as a vegetable.

Trailing Arbutus–Epigaea repens—- This is the one I suspected may be in bloom in dry sandy jack pine areas, nope maybe in¬†7 to 10 days¬†by the look of this photo.

Wild blueberry–Vaccinium angustifolium—Here are the spring blueberry stems which in¬†the photo resembles a wild blueberry plant forest.

Cattails–In this photo both Typha latifolia & Typha angustifolia are growing together you will need to click the photo once or twice to enlarge enough to notice the different head sizes.

Lastly, I’m going to enter a page at some point concerning interesting rocks I encounter, here are¬†a few from tonight’s adventure. Also there are plenty of info on the net for uses of the above plants so check them out if they grow in your area, cheers for true nature.