Tag Archives: Hydnum repandum

Hedgehog Mushroom advisory

15 Sep

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These large young Hedgehog mushrooms are presently appearing in the last week of summer in some of our Maritime mixed forest.

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You best go out and gather a few soon before the frost foils them. ciao

Enough Hedgehogery

26 Sep

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Yah, I’ve been bombarding you with these Hydnum repandum lately though this will be the last post this year on this choice edible mushroom.

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A good look at the teeth on the underside of the cap.

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Some more large half pounders.

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These mushrooms are great fresh and also make a nice powdered mushroom once dried. ciao

A Sweet tooth for Hedgehog mushrooms

14 Sep

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This is a choice edible mushroom I’ve enjoyed eating for a number of years now though I never seen them as plentiful as I did here today.

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Hydnum repandum is known as the Sweet tooth mushroom in North America and the Hedgehog mushroom in english speaking areas of Europe.

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Some of these young mushrooms were weighing around 6 ozs so the basket was filling quickly, the cap color is very lively looking and really stands out from a good distance.

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This mushroom is very good cooked in butter low and slow in a covered pan for 30 to 40 minutes. I usually remove the soft spike teeth before cooking as they scrape away very easy. The mushrooms will give of their liquids in around the 15 minute mark and then they will absorb them again in the last few minutes.

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By far my best collection of Hydnum repandum ever, as you can see a few Lobster mushrooms and Russulas along with at the back between the baskets a nice 5 lb Chaga mushroom horn which I’ll do a post on later. ciao

Craterellus ignicolor and neighbours

13 Aug

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These fresh Hydnum repandum are a welcome sight right here in the heart of the Craterellus ignicolor community.

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This is a choice edible mushroom often called the Hedgehog and also Sweet tooth mushroom. Not very noticeable in the photo are the small spines on the underside of the cap on these young mushrooms which become easier to see as the mushroom matures.(click on for close up)

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Here is another pleasant neighbour Xanthoconium affine var. maculosus, known as the spotted Bolete.

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Now to focus on the Craterellus ignicolor family itself, here we see many bright orange young mushrooms with a few of the elders with their faded caps to the right.

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Here we have a close look of what is comparable to a group of secondary school children in the craterellus community here in New Brunswick.

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A middle aged Craterellus parent.

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Here we see a few members of the national basketball team and then some as these mushroom are much larger than the usual as the stems were around 6 inches high and the caps over 3 inches with these weighing around an oz.

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Hope you enjoyed getting to know some of the little ones of Craterellusville. ciao for now