Tag Archives: groundnut

Apios, the riverbank dangler

29 Jun

DSC07965

I’ve shown photos of the flowers of Apios americana from my backyard many times on the blog though the tubers rarely have been given a chance to shine so with the floods waters gone and the riverbank visible here we see the easiest way to locate where groundnuts usually grow in good numbers though they rarely flower or have much leaf growth.

DSC07967 (2)

Often there will be many strung together on a line.

DSC07962

DSC07964

More a few feet a way.

DSC05918

DSC07960

Apios americana is known to grow larger tubers where it can mingle amongst other roots in moist soil. I find it both flowers and tubers well with daylilies. A photo of flowers in August and today a fresh tuber the size of a medium potato. Groundnut was a popular food for thousands of years in Eastern North American, there are many online sites which can tell you about its history, nutrition value and other interesting stuff. One thing I find interesting is it is a food you can gather anytime the ground isn’t frozen or you may even gather them then if the riverbank still has some danglers.

DSC07971

DSC07973

Here is what I may gather soon unless I stumble upon something else that draws my attention. Here we see elderberry very close to flowering and also wild radish pods, these little ones here tasted quite good. ciao

Apios americana flowers

15 Aug

DSC05916

In my (wild edible plants) page I ‘m adding a few  Apios Americana flower photos as these flowers are rather pleasant to the eye as well as being one of our better wild tuber plants.

DSC05918

This was an important staple food in some parts of North America long ago.

DSC05923

Easy to notice this plant when the flowers are on these vines though in the fall I usually become aware of their presence by seeing groundnut tubers dangling from washed out river banks, this far north I have never noticed seed pods developing on this plant.

DSC05924

Here if you click on the photo you will see the Apios americana vines climbing over these spent Daylily flower stocks with a bed of Jerusalem Artichoke in the background, so we have 3 good tuber plants together in this one. ciao

The hopniss places

1 Aug

The blossoms are still not fully expanded but you get the picture and naturally this is the last day of  daylily flowers in our yard, starting July 1st and ending August 1st, so here are some hopniss blossoms which I introduced to the garden from the St John River which have danced over the daylily stalks  and some blue sky for your enjoyment to ring in the new month.

Some more blossoms and some communities which take their names from this plant Apios americana,—– Shubenacadie and the Shubenacadie river, NS Canada (Mi’kmaq)—–Sag Harbor and Sagaponack NY, USA   (Algonquin)—– Penecook River NH, USA.   I would be surprised if there are not many other areas throughout central and eastern N.A. having places named for this plant which provided a very edible tuber for folks for over 10,000 years in Canada and thousands more years as you head south. I recall finding this plant for the first time along a river in my home county where it wasn’t known to grow and being amazed at the sight of these large richly  colored and finely shaped blossoms. I definitely sat in their company for a while that day.

Click on to get a closer look at the softer colors on the top side of the blossoms.  As you can see they mingled quite naturally here to, only a handful of folks have seen or heard of this plant in this city, but I suspect we may get a street named after them before I leave these parts. ciao

Happy Canada Day

1 Jul

This Daylily flower blossomed just in time for the Canada Day celebration and will wither out to tonight  like the evening fireworks festivities and should become the first member of my dried golden needles collection for 2012 to be enjoyed in soups this winter.

As you can see there are many buds preparing for their day of glory to come soon. Daylilies are native to Eurasia and the fresh buds are also edible though I recommend you check out Green Deane (Eat the weeds) website before you try any of the edible parts of our North American daylilies for the first time.

Here is a daylily flower stalk with an interesting guest climbing it, you will need to click on twice to have a good look at this plants twining nature, this  is a native plant that many folks in North America have been gratefully eating this member of the pea family’s potato like tubers for at least 15,000 years, so that means about 15,000 years before there was a country called Canada or even a word day that meant day. To commemorate this historic sustainer here at my house once this plants lovely flowers bloom, I will then celebrate Apios americana Day, also known as groundnut and hopniss. Lots of reasons to celebrate right here, where ever you are. Have a great Daylily with lots of hopniss. ciao