Tag Archives: cep

Awaken to a Chanterelle dream

27 Jul

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This photo was so magically hazy I had to find away to place it in the post. A few hundred chanterelle on this steep hillside made for some pleasant shady picking. Click on the photo to see all the little orange ones all over the place.

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A closer Chanterelle look but still a little groggy.

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Now in this Maritime dreamland there are more than just Chanterelles as here we see a bolete in the King Bolete clan.

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Check the bottom of the stem to see if it is still solid and no significant worm holes and this one as you can see is in good shape for eating.

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I’ve found this mushrooms conifer cousin before on mature eastern hemlock but here is my first run in with Chicken of the Woods, Laetiporus sulphureus which you will only find on hardwoods, usually the uncommon red oak in my area, unfortunately.

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Some may have a reaction to Laetiporus so start with a small amount the first time out. This is day 2 for me with this mushroom as an edible and really enjoyed it cooked in butter then made into a sandwich with lettuce and mayo, the initial try was a piece the size of a dried apricot sliced in 1/4″ strips and fried in olive oil for 10 minutes which was over cooked but I could see potential. So concludes this dreamy Maritime mushroomy post. ciao

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Basketing Boletus

22 Sep

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This young button mushroom appears to be a King Bolete, Boletus edulis.

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There are lots of King Boletes under these Norway Spruce in this area though there are a few other boletes here which are close relatives and quite choice edibles.

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The one in the center could be possibly Boletus reticulatus as it is known to appear around 400 miles south of here.

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Here is another one with a nice cracked cap. If this is Boletus reticulatus it also goes by the common name of the Summer King Bolete which would be fitting on the last day of summer.

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Another young King Bolete.

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The also good to eat King’s snitch, Clitopilus prunulus, also known as the Miller and Sweetbread mushroom. Where Clitopilus prunulus appears the King Bolete will often soon arrive in the same area.

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Here we see the basket looks pretty fine with these Boletus on board. If you seen a man balancing a large basket of something on the top of his head while walking along the edge of a forest in N.B. Canada yesterday morning, you now know who it was. ciao