Tag Archives: blewit

Time to forage a field

4 Nov

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It’s not to late to still find some good edible mushrooms even with the early morning temps hovering near the freezing point. Here is a nice Boletus to prove it. Today I’ve noticed a lot of activity near my usual gathering grounds as deer hunting season has recently started so it may be wise to make myself a lot more visible, so its time to appear out into some open fields. The key here is to select areas which are not sprayed and safe to walk around in, wear hunter orange just in case someone is where they shouldn’t be. Here are some of the mushrooms you may encounter this week in shore- line picnic parks, well travelled walking trails and open recreational areas in the Maritime provinces.

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Blewits

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Horse mushrooms

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Graylings are sometimes in open heath &  grassy areas as long as there is also hair-cap moss.

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You know it’s kind of nice out here in the sun on these cold ones. ciao

Mushrooms, Today’s frosty 5

19 Oct

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As usual things did not turn out as planned and the mushroom I was most interested in finding is not out yet as it will probably take a few more rains and frosty nights. Nevertheless here are a few good wild edibles which were making an appearance today. In the photo there are over a hundred Grayling mushrooms from the bottom of the photo to the basket, sometimes things are hard to see even when they are right under your feet..

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Grayling, Cantharellula umbonata

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Catathelasma ventricosum

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Wood Blewit, Lepista nuda

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Meadow waxycap, Hygrocybe pratensis

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Lactarius deterrimus

http://nbharbinger.wordpress.com/2013/10/19/what-really-happened-in-rexton/

Click above If you are interested in interbeing, here is a peek at some current events taking place in New Brunswick at this time. ciao

Selenite, chaga steaks and tea post

24 Mar

Just relaxing enjoying a chaga tea while viewing a blewit I entered in my image page last night.

Since a nice chunk of Selenite was already on our step, it seems only polite for it to share the spot light with the Chaga steaks I’ve sliced for drying today. If you are going to dry your own Chaga I suggest you keep your temperature around 120 degrees F or below.

Click on the photo below to see the many thin transparent  layer.

Here is a  close up of the Selenite, this particular piece I collected 25 years ago just under the water level of a steep banked sinkhole pond, I had a challenging time getting down to it as I noticed it shining from the opposite side of the pond and ended up laying head first from the bank feeling for it and eventually was able to bring it up. Travelling that area is interesting as many of the sinkholes are collapsed caves, one small lake in the area is over 200 ft deep. At the time of my Selenite collection it appeared to be freshly exposed earth with the transparent gypsum peeking out here and there.I wasn’t sure what it was then, other than it was unusual, I bought the audubon field guide for rocks and minerals soon after and this made my wild food  adventures even more enjoyable as it opened my eyes a little wider to things in general. Have a great weekend naturally.