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From the doorstep

8 Apr

I walked a few miles yesterday on a local river floodplain and really enjoyed seeing many of my favorite wild plants I like to gather in their early development and some still sleeping, I was going to show these today but I think I’ll show just one and focus more on today.

Insect home in last year’s goldenrod stem.

First open the door, (step 2) take a step on to the step, (step 3) look around, (4) take a few photos. —-The river was low, so it is good to see snow.

Have a great day

wild wild horseradish

5 Apr

Wild horseradish couldn’t drag me away, because no matter what you may be thinking you can only be in the here and now, so don’t worry about staying in the now, truth is you can never physically or spiritually escape it. The physical and spiritual are just concepts appearing in the one or none if you like.

Where was I besides always here and now, oh yes. I stopped in on the ridge tonight to gather a few wild horseradish roots to transplant into my indicator garden, the ridge has several hundred wild horseradish plants there which may have been introduced to that area in the 1600s as a medicinal plant for the early settlers arriving from France and slightly later England in this area known as Beaubassin. I’m not going to mention recipes or anything, just wanted to share with you these photos of this beautifully gnarly wild plant.

Corralled into the new pasture this horseradish looks a bit like colossus dinosaur. Have a great long weekend

Still turning

15 Mar

They claim the earth spins at a speed around a 1,000 mph, yet there is a stillness permeating every particle going through the motions. Of course the orbit speed around our sun is out of this world at over 65,000 mph

This little one laner crossing over the train tracks is tricky as you can’t possibly see anyone approaching from the other side.  This area is kind of famous historically for abandonment  & exodus with the ship railway and Beaubassin practically a stones through away. Over the last 2 decades I’ve only met one person out on the marsh at the end of the pastures and he had travelled over a thousand miles in search of the lands from which his ancestors were expelled from a few hundred years ago. Though I can’t remember any of his family story he had told me which had been past down by word of mouth over the last 300 years, I do though recall being moved by how it touched him. With the world’s highest tides reaching their farthest appendages in this area, I suspect it is the norm for emotions to run rather high, deep, both.   ——– Oh well, moving along.

They built 15 windmills so far and I believe there are 15 more coming soon. it will be interesting to see how they fare in the isthmus once they are activated. I suspect a new energy in the area should stir things up, which is natural.

Shrubby stemicle

26 Feb

It would take quite a few drops from the sun baked roof to create this shady shrub transit masterpiece, really now though, I feel to add that all things are transit masterpieces aren’t they.

Cool local produce

25 Feb

Initially my thought was to collect some Jerusalem artichokes and also to bring a few hopniss tubers inside to grow as house plants.

This area is a section in our yard I devote to some of my favorite wild plants and also a few hardy self-sufficient others which inter-be in this location. Below is a summer view of this area.

Since the ground was still frozen on the snow-covered areas, I decided to check out some of the plants located near the edge of the surrounding buildings.

Here is the biennial, evening primrose.

Some sweet cicely under icy water.

Lastly near the foundation of the house some Jerusalem artichokes were obtained for supper.

You can click on the photos to get a closer look, also in coming months I will revisit this wild garden area to share and possibly introduce many of the plants which were not visible in the summer photo above, this will include mints, woundwort, hopniss, caraway, sweet cicely, orpine, chives, stinging nettle, yellow goatsbeard, sea rocket, orache, seaside plantain, mustards, smartweeds, sorrels and surprisingly quite a few more.

If your a wild food gatherer, a little indicator garden like this one can be helpful in choosing where and when to plan some of your wildcrafting excursions, especially if you are travelling some distance to your collecting grounds, this one has been most helpful to me, I can assure you. cheers for here

No tree stands alone

4 Feb

Here on the Isthmus of Chignecto it only appears these pioneers have left their home lands to see the forest for the trees. click on to enjoy the big picture.

Chaga mushroom appears good to me

16 Jan

Chaga mushroom tea (Inonotus obliquus) is a welcomed visitor on the ever shifting river me, as it trickles and meanders through the various passages attracted to the most acidic particles on the shores and in the murkier pools diligently driven into various always present new forms. I’ve never found info on the complete life cycle of chaga, it can’t be grown commercially, the fertile assumed spore producing stage is a mystery. The mycelium appears in a variety of different tree trunks and the (sterile conk) known as  the chaga mushroom normally is seen on wounds on the trunk, the best medicinal properties are alleged to come from chagas growing on birch trees, I gather them from only (paper and yellow birches) which are still alive enough to produce leaves during the growing season and usually collect my chaga for the year during the coldest days of winter.

The mycelium which produce chaga will at the same time be shortening the life cycle of the tree it inhabits, so in the illusion — one things disease is another things cure.  I’ve been drinking chaga tea for a few years now and have to spread the word on this, though please harvest this respectfully.  I usually drink 4 or 5 cups per week and harvest approximately 10 lbs per year, this is plenty for myself and a few others I share with. I usually during the summer months while gathering other gifts choose a tree or 2 to revisit later on. In the colder northern areas this is one of the few items we can gather at this time of the year, as shown in one of the pictures in the (chaga page),  we have a little bit of snow mostly in Jan and Feb plus today we had a wind chill factor of -28 degrees, I’m not going to go into all the details on the medicinal properties here, I will list below words to search under if you are interested in learning more. Oh I believe the FDA has it listed as safe as a food or food coloring though I didn’t look this up recently, so check for yourself. It has been used as a table tea in areas of Siberia for century’s. It taste pretty good though I usually mix in a few other herbs and fruits, once prepared you can drink it hot or cold. I also boil rice in the tea occasionally. There are numerous whys to prepare the tea, I’ve tried many but today go with the easiest methods which produce great results, so keep it simple. (Click on enlarge the pics in the chaga page next to the image page above right for some close-ups on some of the different shapes of chage) They can range from 1/4 to 10 lbs. If you have any questions, enter a comment, I may have some info specific to your interest.

SEARCH LIST  Chaga mushroom medicinal properties, ORAC rating, betulinac acid, anti oxidants, chemotherapy, adaptogen, detoxification, healing wounds, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, blood pressure, skin care.