Archive | impermanence RSS feed for this section

That fluffy light feeling

15 Nov

20141114_190503

The first snow landed gently last evening.

20141114_190440

Even the smaller branches will withstand snow of this nature.

20141115_074804

This morning the feelings is still here in the freshness of the obvious change.

20141115_074916

Another morning view and now as I write these words the snow has already left all the branches in the photos.

20141111_132711

Moving on in more of a wintergreen direction, a look at the largest Teaberry I’ve ever seen. ciao

Fall Jack Pine understory

8 Oct

DSC07572

Huckleberries plants now with red leaves makes it real easy to also notice the blue to black fruit.

DSC07575

Huckleberries really show their numbers in this Jack Pine forest come fall, click on the photo to see the numerous berries.

DSC07489

Hucks and Matsutakes.

DSC07500

Here we see our largest Maritime woodpecker who climbs backwards down the tree trunk to get low enough to reach back for some berries. These plants are usually waist high on humans so this is the easiest way for them to pick yet they really stretch their necks to get it done.

DSC07506

This Pileated Woodpecker (click on my cybershot photo my friends) seems to be on the same visiting schedule as me as we met here last week in the evening. This one chooses to stay around 100 feet from me and circles around me for 10 minutes or so. You may have noticed there has been a clearcut on both sides of this 200 foot strip of Jack Pine so many of the fruiting plants, matsutake, birds and all the rest are dealing with the changes. ciao

Appearing today

7 Sep

DSC07333DSC07334

The Grayling, Cantharellula umbonata

DSC07344DSC07345

Amethyst Deceiver, Laccaria amethystine

DSC07335

Swollen Stalk Cat, Cathelasma ventricosum

DSC07324DSC07325

King Bolete, Boletus edulis

DSC07326

Lobster mushrooms, Hypomyces lactifluorum     It is amazing how we feel familiar with what is never the same. ciao

Off to Aronia Avenue

25 Aug

DSC05996

A view from the ridge, up front Canadian Thistle and Burdock

DSC05995

A closer look at some colorful Burdocks and then down we go into the marsh on an old paved road that has seen little traffic since the 1960s.

DSC05999

I’m not sure if this mile of road already has a name or not but at least for today I’m calling it Aronia Ave. as the Aronia has been the most successful plant coming out of the marsh to make it out here on the street. You can’t even notice a crack where it came from but here it is and it has some old chums tagging along on the side lines.

DSC06004

Under the Aronia berries we see a thick bed of unripe bog cranberries.

DSC06003

Aronia  with a few blueberries to the right.

DSC06006

Aronia facing some cran and blue berries below, here we have 3 very health giving berries for the creatures who happen by here.

DSC06008

The marsh community is very generously giving it back to the street it has been the foundation of for many years and this afternoon’s tide highly agrees, stating nothing can never really disengage. ciao

Return to cinder

12 Apr

Address unknown, I believe there was a garage here in the early 1960s before they closed this road due to the new trans Canada highway.

These blocks have become comfy protective homes for a few plant.

Moss grows fat on and in  non-rolling stones

This is slightly off subject though this tiny intruder appeared to inch worm his way into my car while I was enjoying the mossy cinders. You may need to click the photo to see him well.

I watched this little stowaway travel round & round for 15 minutes before I stopped the car at home, he was rather dazed and tired by the time I helped him off and into his new surroundings, but like the moss, plants and cinder blocks discovered in their journeys, home is where you find yourself, it happens true to nature.

No nonsense

11 Apr

good morning

I don’t know what to call it, moss, lichen, tree branch, fungus, decay, life, etc

I’m still standing, this area has lots of trees cycling naturally in the oneness.

Here is a Phellinus, I’ll need to search around for its first name though they are very common here, I’ve seen hundreds just this evening.

This old fungus could tell some stories.

The number of holes on this tree trunk is rather unusual in these woods. You may need to click on the photo to notice these.

I suppose it is time to turn in, good night.

From the doorstep

8 Apr

I walked a few miles yesterday on a local river floodplain and really enjoyed seeing many of my favorite wild plants I like to gather in their early development and some still sleeping, I was going to show these today but I think I’ll show just one and focus more on today.

Insect home in last year’s goldenrod stem.

First open the door, (step 2) take a step on to the step, (step 3) look around, (4) take a few photos. —-The river was low, so it is good to see snow.

Have a great day