Archive | July, 2017

Lowbush Blueberries

29 Jul

Super short post on a Maritime wild food favorite, low bush blueberries which tend to grow well in sandy acidic soils, usually dry ones.

Often around this time of the year wild mushrooms are my focus, but with a very dry July in my neck of the woods blueberries came through as a nice alternative which will be much appreciated this winter in many ways. Blueberries are great in desserts and are surprisingly attractive and tasty good in soups, casseroles, etc.

I claimed it was a super short post so I’ll end with the above photo which stirred the stream of thoughts of these lucky blueberries enjoying some lovely shade under a canopy of pleasant scented sweet fern, at a restful blueberry resort right here in New Brunswick ūüôā

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Leccinum piceinum

20 Jul

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Here are some photos from a few weeks ago when I gathered a bunch of Leccinum piceinum for drying. The safety in eating orange and red capped Leccinum has been in question for the last decade as a number of folks in NA have suffered GI distress after eating these mushroom fresh and possibly under-cooked but maybe well cooked as well? Supposedly no one has had any issues with the dried mushrooms which can be used in soups or cooked after rehydration. I suspect drying is the way to go if you have any interest in eating red or orange capped Leccinum mushrooms which are usually difficult to identify to specific name.

These mushrooms are real standouts in mossy spruce forest anywhere from late June till November when conditions are right in the Maritimes.

A look under the cap at the pore layer and loose tissue along the edge of the cap.

This is probably the easiest red/orange Leccinum to ID due to it growing in mossy spruce areas with no birch or poplar trees to complicate matters as there are several types of Leccinums growing under those hardwood trees.

Last look at quite a photogenic Maritime mushroom. ciao

 

 

Butyriboletus brunneus

16 Jul

Here is a common Maritime mushroom I’ve avoided doing a post on as some folks will experience allergic reaction to members of this (butter bolete group), even common edibles such as Blewits will cause some people issues, this of course goes beyond wild mushrooms, it’s across the board with foods we find in stores or forest. ¬†I’m not sure of the percentage who will develop GI symptoms from eating these but¬†I suspect it is over 1 in 10 so you may want to not chance this one, for those who¬†try it and it agrees with your system it is an excellent edible.¬†Again though unless you have a long list of wild edible mushrooms you have already tried, it would be unwise to experiment eating one like this early on. This mushroom should be thinly sliced and cooked long. I usually dry them as I like most bolete type mushroom dried to enhance their¬†flavour.

This is a young version, pore surface bright yellow and thin to the cap flesh, stem short and robust.

Here we see the fishnet markings on the right side of the stem which help in identify this mushroom.

Older mushroom with gill layer very thick, on most bolete family members this would mean this mushroom would be too soft and worm holes throughout.

Older mushroom flipped over.

1Left scribed on pores, this helps to ID as the pores should blue quickly after touched.

Here we see the flesh under the thick pore layer still solid and suitable for the table.

I should also mention these mushrooms dry very nicely and have an unusual aroma which I couldn’t find a good description of until¬† someone who visited asked if a cake was in the oven and yes a homemade white cake or sugared lemon loaf fresh from the oven does smell similar, believe it or not. I may try the mushroom powder in desserts or pancakes.

Umbrella polypore

13 Jul

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Short post on my first gathering of Polyporus umbellatus which is a rare and quite unusual wild edible mushroom here the Maritime provinces. This Umbrella polypore is the size of a loaf of bread and has a scent of toffee. Umbrella polypore is also aka the medicinal mushroom Zhu Ling which makes use of the large woody sclerotia underground the fruiting mushroom. These sclerotia left as is should produce fruiting mushrooms for decades, so I shall return next year to check this out. Zhu Ling is best known for its results for folks with lung cancer and has a long history of usage in China. As for ¬†tastiness of this above ground mushroom, I’ll add a comment later on after I fry some up. This mushroom was found near birch, poplar and young beech so keep your eyes open my fellow Maritime foragers.

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