Archive | September, 2015

Jack-in-the-pulpit

30 Sep

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I do not see many good photos of this plant in the berry stage and still having green leaves above so decided to share this one of Arisaema triphyllum which I recently noticed along a small stream near home. This beautiful floodplain plant is known for having an edible root once it is thinly sliced and thoroughly dried for a long period. In my area it is not near common enough for me to try as a food, plus this plant as a whole is loaded with mouth stinging calcium oxylate crystals which limits its usability, sure is nice to see though.

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Here is an old pic from my blog library taken in spring 2013 of this plant who has the common name of Jack-in-the-pulpit due to how it looks while flowering in the spring, click on the photo to notice the unique spathe and spadix under my thumb.

NS Mycological Society Foray 2015

17 Sep

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The annual Nova Scotia mushroom foray is not far off, so here is small plug for the event and a chance to show a few of the many mushrooms you may find on one of the trails on Saturday Sept 26th during that weekend. There are usually a few surprises with new additions being placed on their species list every year and the pic above of some Slippery Jill ( Suillus salmonicolor ) which  I found recently in my area would make the list for the first time if found during one of the trail walks. Here is their website address if you’re a Maritimer and fancy a foray this early fall. – ns.mushroom.org

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Another interesting mushroom I noticed in recent days were these tiny though oh so garlicky smelling little ones which may have been more out spoken due to the dampness that day as these had a strong and very pleasant fresh garlic scent. At first I thought they were Gymnopus perforans  though they in my experience are quite mild compared to what I’ve found here which maybe – or – are a close kin to Mycetinis scorodonius a mushroom I have some culinary interest in and it also would be a newbie on the NSMS species list and should catch many of guard long before you squint to see these bad boys on one of the identification tables folks will be viewing as each trail group will set up their own table for everyone to check out, not doubt this is a common Maritime mushroom which due to its tiny size doesn’t get gathered very often.

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I should mention some of the pleasant visuals you will no doubt encounter along the way like this Reishi mushroom relative which being as beautiful and useful in nature as it is, naturally was given a common name  by man – here you see Artist Conk ( Ganoderma applanatum) with a nice shiny cap on a wet one a few days back.

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Here are a couple more recent Maritime colorful mushroom pics of what you may find at the foray, don’t make me show or tell you anymore about the great things you’ll experience at the foray just go to their website and make plans for some new discoveries the weekend of Sept 25 -26-27 at the Deanery in Ship Harbour, Nova Scotia. ciao

 

Marinated Lobster mushrooms

16 Sep

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My computer is on the blink it seems so here is my first attempt at a phone post, interested see how it will pan out. Above you see some Lobster mushrooms I’m salting which is one of the first steps in this Italian mushroom marinate recipe from ( honest-food.net — 17) check it out, I’ve tried this recipe with Russula mustelina and Lobster mushrooms last month and they both turned out great.

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It is surprising more folks are not gathering Lobster mushrooms here on the east coast as they are quite common, usually in clusters of 3 to 5 mushrooms. You do seem to lose  some of the mushroom during cleaning as they have soil embedded in them though from this cluster after paring off what I didn’t want I still walked away with 2 lbs of choice wild mushrooms which I would usually dry and eat a small amount fresh though now I really like this mushroom pickled or in this recipe mentioned above from Hunter Anglar Gardener Cook where you salt, boil in vinegar, dry (which I’m going to check my dryer in a minute) then jar up and cover with spiced olive oil. Well I better go get’em.  Ciao

Bunchberries, the fastest slow food

8 Sep

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A few pics and a couple links to some interesting stuff on a like known ground growing fruit, common throughout most of Canada, bunchberries – Cornus Canadensis.

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The large seed in each drupe is the main reason this is not a popular fruit in this country today where we have many different types of berries which are much easier to eat in a social setting though bunchberries do have their charm, one is you can pick a large amount in no time, they also stay in good shape to pick for several weeks if not months.

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The berries which I gathered here in the pics made a rather nice sauce, 8 cups of berries brought to a boil with a bit of water then simmered , seeds strained out, it takes some time to work the pulp away from the seeds but in the end with some sugar and cinnamon it turned into a smoky thick grape colored sauce.

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The sauce quite tasty, but the most interesting thing I found was the soothing feeling I noticed on the mouth and throat, never experienced this in a sauce before, so something healthy in that pulp I suspect.  I also tried squeezing the pulp of the raw fruit, dripping it through a strainer to test if it would jell up some as I was hoping to dry it after jelling to use as a dry fruit candy but that didn’t pan out at all – as the pulp was in to small amounts per work and it stayed to liquidity.

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Here is a photo of a bunchberry flower I took early on when I started this blog a few years ago and a couple links to some info on this older than the hills, little eaten today, fast moving smoothie. http://www.williams.edu/go/explodingflower

and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFR17bX0noI