Foggy foraging

1 Sep

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This is my favorite forest for tree burls with several hundred mature conifers with impressive burls, on this foggy holiday some like this one provide quite an atmosphere to wander amongst.

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Since I’ve never gathered the White Matsutake mushroom this early in Sept or in this area this leaves me to suspect this must be my first sighting of a Catathelasma ventricosum mushroom this year.

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Yup, this is what we call in NA the Swollen Stalked Cat which is a good edible and is becoming more popular here in the west, though it has a long history of being used as a healthy food in areas like Tibet. Here it is often used in stews, soups, it can also be BBQ’ed and pickled. This one smells like cucumber.

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Oh, nearing a brook I see a shrub I often forget about in the fog of the busy mushroom season, though this is an ideal time to gather the ripe firm fruit of Highbush cranberries which can be frozen and then thawed to make it easier to obtain the juice by pressing raw. I chewed and sucked on a few of the crunchy berries and then removed the large seed from my mouth, these are tart and refreshing and vitamin C rich. Well I’ve shared enough interesting stuff for today. ciao

A moving day under the trees

31 Aug

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Hoping to gather some King Bolete mushrooms today under Norway Spruce, but this one was the only one I found in good shape so it was time to move on and go with the flow which was to gather a few different edibles and marvel at the shapes and colors of some of the other mushrooms which go unmentioned usually in my post.

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First stop was in an eastern white cedar forest which is a place I can’t recall visiting at this time of year so I don’t know what to expect,  the orange of Lactarius thyinos is the first mushroom which catches my eye.

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Eastern white cedar again and I have no idea what mushroom this is though its stem is interesting, a wild guess would be something from the Hebeloma family. I’ll dry these and send them away for identification.

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Last photo from under eastern white cedar and again I’m stumped as this is again a mushroom I’m unfamiliar with though it probably is a Sarcodon member judging by the teeth under the cap. I think I’ll leave here now as I’m starting to notice how little I know.

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Here I am again in a forest I often visit and the mushroom of the day in large numbers was the Gypsy mushroom in this mixed woods of beech, birch and hemlock.

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Favouring the beech and birch were these Hedgehog mushrooms.

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A Lobster mushroom along the path surrounded by young birch.

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Oh this is actually something I was expecting to run into one day and here it is Laccaria ochropurpurea, lovely colors just a few footsteps from the Lobster mushroom above so we are still under young birch on a overgrown pathway.

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Last photo of the day before reaching the car, growing around an old beech stump with its yellow spots on cap is Xanthoconium affine var maculosus aka the spotted bolete. ciao

Mushroom page post

24 Aug

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Going to add these photos to my (wild edible mushroom) page eventually, so I thought some folks may like to see what is currently appearing in one of our Maritime forest. Above we see a few Boletus subglabripes which is our most common summer Boletus, it is not very large though it makes up for this in its great numbers in our typical mixed woods of poplar, red maple, birch and conifers.

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Here is drier load of B subglabripes from yesterday

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Gypsy mushrooms are also starting to show, as you can see in moss only the cap is usually visible.

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Here is a look at some young Gypsy mushroom (Cortinarius caperatus) lifted from the moss and these are at a good edible stage.

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Looking at these 2 orange colored Lactarius mushrooms it appears their orange latex on their gills is not going to stain green or burgundy so they must be Lactarius thyinos which is a good edible mushroom. This is a mushroom I do not find many of though I may receive a surprise some day.

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Surprises are very common in our forest as it is rare a day when I am not , example – I wasn’t expecting to find any Boletus caerulescens an other choice edible in a mossy conifer woods of pine and balsam fir yesterday when I usually only notice this mushroom under Norway Spruce, but here they are. ciao

Little Hedgehogs and Chocolate Milky

20 Aug

DSC07199Gathering lots of mushrooms lately with all the rain recently and haven’t posted or viewed much in quite awhile so time to catch up on things here, the little mushrooms above are Hydnum umbilicatum, the (little hedgehog) which I usually do not noticed till Oct though this year they are common in mixed woods with mossy floors. They are a tiny mushroom and quite tasty with a nice crunchiness and usually grow in large groups.

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Here the spike-like teeth are noticeable under the mushroom’s caps.

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Chocolate Milky (Lactarius lignyotus) is a mushroom I’ve admired for many years though I just recently found out they are edible as many field guides I’ve read over the years never mention their edibility.The Mycoquebec website here in Canada rates Lactarius lignyotus as a good edible and I agree after having a few serving this week.

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Here we see the white to cream colored gills which stands out against the dark brown cap and stem. This is another small mushroom which takes plenty of picking to make a meal though they to are often in large groups in mossy conifer woods.

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This is a photo from last Oct showing the white milky latex which appears when the gills are touched, at that time I was simply enjoying the beauty of this mushroom as its edibility was still unknown to me.

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I’ve been gathering some larger mushrooms as well, here are some Lobster mushrooms.

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Boletus subcaerulescens

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You also see some small white Miller mushrooms Clitopilus prunulus which indicate the size of this bolete which weighed a pound and a half.

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A basket of large Chanterelles.

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Lastly a mushroom I suspect most Maritime mushroom pickers are unaware we have here, at least I was surprised to see so many Tree-Ears (Auricularia auricula) around this year. ciao

Gathering together

2 Aug

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Gathering in a new area today and noticed a large thicket of Choke cherries with many Staghorn sumac as well, looking at the fruit the numerous seeds evident.

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When a situation exist things naturally flourish as these are here, this is certainly pleasant to see.

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Seed or spore, a receptive landing and nature does it and if a forager has gathered in this Chanterelle patch previously they have done so with good success and  a gentle hand.

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Chanterelles marching up the hillside, this is a pleasant challenge to choose a non-destructive way to gather a few of these on this mossy steep hillside. Gather your mushrooms deer-like and we will all do fine.

Coloring the Maritime forest

1 Aug

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Let us start with the Blusher (Amanita amerirubescens), I’m not pushing this mushroom as an edible though, it is in the post like all the other photos today for looks only.

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Hydnellum peckii is quite a sight as it gradually dyes itself from white to reddish.

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First Lobster mushrooms I’ve seen this summer, they did a nice job taking over these once white Russula mushrooms

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Here is a series of 5 photos of Leccinum aurantiacum, the last 3 of the cut stem as it moves from white, pink, purple and black in just a few minutes after slicing.

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The mighty tiny Laccaria amethystina plentiful in moss right now.

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Watermelon berry, I wasn’t expecting to see this plant today and this was the only one in the area I noticed.

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American Fly Honeysuckle looking good.

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Well that’s it for now. ciao

Little known locals

28 Jul

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what is it

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oh, it has a tail.

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Didn’t know it at first but this is a stinkhorn egg probably Phallus impudicus, rarely if eaten at all in N.A.

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This one is not uncommon though it is usually just one mid size mushroom which doesn’t draw much attention until you try to pick one. The stem will either snap when breaks like a green bean or you will pull up 1/2 ft of underground stem root. Only the caps of Hymenopellis furfuracea are edible.

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Lastly is a colorful mushroom which I often don’t find most years though this year there are many in Maritime mixed and conifer forest, (Boletus speciosus var brunneus), it has quite a name doesn’t it. This mushroom is considered edible though a fraction of the population will experience stomach trouble so you may choose to leave this one off your edible list. Hope you enjoyed seeing some of the locals we rarely get a chance to meet. ciao

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