Forager’s Mobiles

14 Oct

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There are 3 different types of Highbush Cranberries in the province of New Brunswick and these ones we see dangling above my head are the best edible one in my vicinity being Viburnum trilobum which grows usually near streams and river floodplains. These berry clusters are extremely easy to gather in nature’s nursery though the processing into juice can seem lengthy unless you really enjoy getting to know your food. Each berry has one large seed and it is best to juice these berries raw after freezing them.

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Back to a view of these berries hanging gently in the sky above, what I’ll be doing with them once juiced isn’t quite clear just yet though an apple cider -Highbush cranberry mix sounds good and possibly a ginger bug Highbush soda, though these are just little thought clouds appearing amongst the clusters at this point. ciao

Fall Jack Pine understory

8 Oct

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Huckleberries plants now with red leaves makes it real easy to also notice the blue to black fruit.

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Huckleberries really show their numbers in this Jack Pine forest come fall, click on the photo to see the numerous berries.

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Hucks and Matsutakes.

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Here we see our largest Maritime woodpecker who climbs backwards down the tree trunk to get low enough to reach back for some berries. These plants are usually waist high on humans so this is the easiest way for them to pick yet they really stretch their necks to get it done.

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This Pileated Woodpecker (click on my cybershot photo my friends) seems to be on the same visiting schedule as me as we met here last week in the evening. This one chooses to stay around 100 feet from me and circles around me for 10 minutes or so. You may have noticed there has been a clearcut on both sides of this 200 foot strip of Jack Pine so many of the fruiting plants, matsutake, birds and all the rest are dealing with the changes. ciao

White Matsutake photos

4 Oct

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Large White Matsutake mushroom.

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Another view.

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A nice group photo.

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A smaller one in deep moss.

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Now out of the moss and almost into the basket. ciao

 

Swollen-stalked Cat

2 Oct

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Usually find just one collection with enough Catathelasma ventricosum for a good basket full these last few years and tonight’s gatherings maybe the best of the lot as these are very freshly emerged mushrooms with only a few breaking their cap veils.

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This mushroom is not very common in most parts of North America and gets very little press as a good edible here though the folks from the Tibet homelands and other mountainous areas of Asia would know this mushroom very well, both as an ancient medicinal and welcomed food especially in soups and stews.  This mushroom is commercially harvested and froze or dried for export from Yunnan province China. good chance you may have already eaten some of these along your path unknowingly.  ciao

Hedgehog Mushroom advisory

15 Sep

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These large young Hedgehog mushrooms are presently appearing in the last week of summer in some of our Maritime mixed forest.

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You best go out and gather a few soon before the frost foils them. ciao

Wild Mushroom Workshop and Foray

14 Sep

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A great variety of wild mushrooms are making an appearance in Maritime forest at this time and in Moncton there will be a 3 hr Workshop on Sept 21  — search  –(Nature Moncton) and click on —activities—- scroll down to Sept 21 —- for details and to register

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The following weekend starting Sept 26 is the annual NS Mycological Society Foray which will be held in Wallace  NS a good central location for Maritimers, —search—-NS Mushrooms or http://www.nsmushroom.org – for details

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The wild mushroom I’ve featured today is a bit of a colourful rarity in this area of world and workshops and forays are a great opportunity to see the amazing forms of life often left unknown to us.

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As we become more aware of the naturally provided foods, medicinal plants and mushrooms along with acknowledging their beauty we will definitely be naturally engaged in their which is inevitably our own protection and well being.

DSC07247Here is a coconut scented mushroom, in wild mushroom discovery scent, texture, density and color all come into play. More than 3/4 of the folks who visit my post are from areas outside Canada so to all of you local and otherwise I wish you naturally pleasant trails. ciao

Appearing today

7 Sep

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The Grayling, Cantharellula umbonata

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Amethyst Deceiver, Laccaria amethystine

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Swollen Stalk Cat, Cathelasma ventricosum

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King Bolete, Boletus edulis

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Lobster mushrooms, Hypomyces lactifluorum     It is amazing how we feel familiar with what is never the same. ciao

Summer, mushrooms and change

6 Sep

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Chanterelle is a mushroom I started gathering around 35 years ago and the mushroom in front of the 2 chanterelle mushrooms in the photo Lactarius lignyotus, the Chocolate Milky is one I have recently began to gather for the table.

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Still undecided whether I’ll add this one to my Wild Edible Mushroom page as there is little info on its edibility beyond a few sources from Quebec Canada. I know I can eat this mushroom with no problem so far though I’m not sure how many folks have actually tried it in NA and worldwide.

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The cap and stem of this mushroom are almost black in color when they first appear, then the cap and stem gradually fade to light brown. The gills start out almost white and start gradually darkening up to also become light brown, so when very mature the mushrooms cap, stem and gills are shades of light brown. I’ll keep eating and experimenting with recipes before I make a decision on this guy.

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These Chocolate Milkys are common under spruce and other conifers so they can be gathered in good numbers though the are fragile and crush easily in your basket if layered. In conifers these mushrooms often grow where Hedgehog and Chanterelle are so it will be convenient gathering if this one becomes a wild mushroom I can trust as a safe edible long term.

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Last photo is my first sighting of Craterrellus tubaeformis the Winter Chanterelle, hang in there summer. ciao

Foggy foraging

1 Sep

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This is my favorite forest for tree burls with several hundred mature conifers with impressive burls, on this foggy holiday some like this one provide quite an atmosphere to wander amongst.

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Since I’ve never gathered the White Matsutake mushroom this early in Sept or in this area this leaves me to suspect this must be my first sighting of a Catathelasma ventricosum mushroom this year.

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Yup, this is what we call in NA the Swollen Stalked Cat which is a good edible and is becoming more popular here in the west, though it has a long history of being used as a healthy food in areas like Tibet. Here it is often used in stews, soups, it can also be BBQ’ed and pickled. This one smells like cucumber.

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Oh, nearing a brook I see a shrub I often forget about in the fog of the busy mushroom season, though this is an ideal time to gather the ripe firm fruit of Highbush cranberries which can be frozen and then thawed to make it easier to obtain the juice by pressing raw. I chewed and sucked on a few of the crunchy berries and then removed the large seed from my mouth, these are tart and refreshing and vitamin C rich. Well I’ve shared enough interesting stuff for today. ciao

A moving day under the trees

31 Aug

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Hoping to gather some King Bolete mushrooms today under Norway Spruce, but this one was the only one I found in good shape so it was time to move on and go with the flow which was to gather a few different edibles and marvel at the shapes and colors of some of the other mushrooms which go unmentioned usually in my post.

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First stop was in an eastern white cedar forest which is a place I can’t recall visiting at this time of year so I don’t know what to expect,  the orange of Lactarius thyinos is the first mushroom which catches my eye.

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Eastern white cedar again and I have no idea what mushroom this is though its stem is interesting, a wild guess would be something from the Hebeloma family. I’ll dry these and send them away for identification.

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Last photo from under eastern white cedar and again I’m stumped as this is again a mushroom I’m unfamiliar with though it probably is a Sarcodon member judging by the teeth under the cap. I think I’ll leave here now as I’m starting to notice how little I know.

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Here I am again in a forest I often visit and the mushroom of the day in large numbers was the Gypsy mushroom in this mixed woods of beech, birch and hemlock.

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Favouring the beech and birch were these Hedgehog mushrooms.

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A Lobster mushroom along the path surrounded by young birch.

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Oh this is actually something I was expecting to run into one day and here it is Laccaria ochropurpurea, lovely colors just a few footsteps from the Lobster mushroom above so we are still under young birch on a overgrown pathway.

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Last photo of the day before reaching the car, growing around an old beech stump with its yellow spots on cap is Xanthoconium affine var maculosus aka the spotted bolete. ciao

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